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15

Apr

The Forwood Monument stands in St John’s Gardens in Liverpool, England. It depicts the 19th Century merchant, ship owner and Tory MP Arthur Bower Forwood, who was Liverpool’s mayor and Privy Councillor. Forwood eventually became First Secretary to the Admiralty, and became a baron in 1895. The statue was designed by Sir George Frampton (1860-1928), who was a leading member of the New Sculpture movement. Frampton is most famous for the statue of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, the lions at the British Museum, and the Edith Cavell monument that stands outside the National Portrait Gallery.Frampton depicted Forwood in the pose he usually adopted when making a speech, and is wearing the clothes common to his era, as opposed to an academic gown or other masking device. The statue was erected in 1903, unveiled in 1904, and photographed in 2012.

The Forwood Monument stands in St John’s Gardens in Liverpool, England. It depicts the 19th Century merchant, ship owner and Tory MP Arthur Bower Forwood, who was Liverpool’s mayor and Privy Councillor. Forwood eventually became First Secretary to the Admiralty, and became a baron in 1895.

The statue was designed by Sir George Frampton (1860-1928), who was a leading member of the New Sculpture movement. Frampton is most famous for the statue of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, the lions at the British Museum, and the Edith Cavell monument that stands outside the National Portrait Gallery.

Frampton depicted Forwood in the pose he usually adopted when making a speech, and is wearing the clothes common to his era, as opposed to an academic gown or other masking device. The statue was erected in 1903, unveiled in 1904, and photographed in 2012.

10

Apr

A 1905 Memorial to the King’s Liverpool Regiment by Sir William Goscombe John. At the top of it stands the figure of Britannia, mourning men of this old, long-established infantry regiment who lost their lives fighting in Afghanistan (1878-80), Burma (1885-87) and South Africa (1899-1902). St John’s Gardens, Liverpool, 2012.

A 1905 Memorial to the King’s Liverpool Regiment by Sir William Goscombe John. At the top of it stands the figure of Britannia, mourning men of this old, long-established infantry regiment who lost their lives fighting in Afghanistan (1878-80), Burma (1885-87) and South Africa (1899-1902). St John’s Gardens, Liverpool, 2012.

08

Apr

A 1901 statue of four-time British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone (1809-1898) by Italian sculptor Mario Raggi. The statue depicts Gladstone debating the issue of Irish home rule, and was itself depicted in an 1910 oil painting by Adolphe Valette. This statue is located outside Manchester Town Hall, and was photographed in 2012.

A 1901 statue of four-time British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone (1809-1898) by Italian sculptor Mario Raggi. The statue depicts Gladstone debating the issue of Irish home rule, and was itself depicted in an 1910 oil painting by Adolphe Valette. This statue is located outside Manchester Town Hall, and was photographed in 2012.

04

Apr

An 1893 marble statue of James Prescott Joule (1781-1841), by Sir Alfred Gilbert (1854-1934).  Joule, who was the son of a Salford brewer, is best known for his scientific discoveries about the mechanical value of heat, and the conservation of energy. The ‘joule’, the unit of energy, is named in his honour. This statue sits in the entrance vestibule of Manchester Town Hall, opposite the Francis Chantrey sculpture of Joule’s mentor John Dalton, who is known for his pioneering work in the development of modern atomic theory, and his research into colour blindness (sometimes referred to as Daltonism). While the statue of Dalton was installed in the vestibule in 1884 (having been relocated from the Royal Manchester Institution, now the Manchester Art Gallery), this statue was built as a companion piece nine years later. Alfred Gilbert’s Joule is a more relaxed and informal-looking statue than Chantrey’s Dalton. Gilbert has a marble Joule, dressed in a “loose dressing jacket” (according to the information plaque) and loose slippers, examining a metal scientific instrument.

An 1893 marble statue of James Prescott Joule (1781-1841), by Sir Alfred Gilbert (1854-1934).  Joule, who was the son of a Salford brewer, is best known for his scientific discoveries about the mechanical value of heat, and the conservation of energy. The ‘joule’, the unit of energy, is named in his honour. This statue sits in the entrance vestibule of Manchester Town Hall, opposite the Francis Chantrey sculpture of Joule’s mentor John Dalton, who is known for his pioneering work in the development of modern atomic theory, and his research into colour blindness (sometimes referred to as Daltonism).

While the statue of Dalton was installed in the vestibule in 1884 (having been relocated from the Royal Manchester Institution, now the Manchester Art Gallery), this statue was built as a companion piece nine years later. Alfred Gilbert’s Joule is a more relaxed and informal-looking statue than Chantrey’s Dalton. Gilbert has a marble Joule, dressed in a “loose dressing jacket” (according to the information plaque) and loose slippers, examining a metal scientific instrument.

03

Apr

Photographed at the 2013 Edinburgh Book Festival, these figures stand at the base of Sir John Steell’s 1876 Prince Albert Memorial in the city’s Charlotte Square Gardens. Steell (1804 -91) won the commission in an 1865 competition, and was knighted for his work when the statue was unveiled nine years later.However, the statues seen here were sculpted by the prolific Victorian sculptor William Brodie (1815-87), whose most famous work is Edinburgh’s ‘Greyfriar’s Bobby’ statue. This group, a smartly-dressed husband and wife, represent ‘The Nobility’.

Photographed at the 2013 Edinburgh Book Festival, these figures stand at the base of Sir John Steell’s 1876 Prince Albert Memorial in the city’s Charlotte Square Gardens. Steell (1804 -91) won the commission in an 1865 competition, and was knighted for his work when the statue was unveiled nine years later.

However, the statues seen here were sculpted by the prolific Victorian sculptor William Brodie (1815-87), whose most famous work is Edinburgh’s ‘Greyfriar’s Bobby’ statue. This group, a smartly-dressed husband and wife, represent ‘The Nobility’.

02

Apr

This twelve-foot-tall steel sculpture, which is made of recycled oil drums, stands in Kewsick in Northwest England. It was hand-made by a team of ten Kenyan artists, who cut and hammered it into shape on a tree stump, and then welded it together. It was then container-shipped to the UK.

This twelve-foot-tall steel sculpture, which is made of recycled oil drums, stands in Kewsick in Northwest England. It was hand-made by a team of ten Kenyan artists, who cut and hammered it into shape on a tree stump, and then welded it together. It was then container-shipped to the UK.

01

Apr

Located on Castle Road in Nottingham, England, this 7ft statue of Robin Hood stands on a two-and-a-half ton block of white Clipsham stone. Cast in eight pieces of half-inch thick bronze (ostensibly made to last for 6,000 years), and weighing half a ton,  the statue was unveiled by the Duchess of Portland on July 24th 1952.Businessman and benefactor Philip E F Clay, gifted the statue to Nottingham in order to commemorate the city’s famous folk hero. In 1949, Clay commissioned the respected Royal Academy sculptor James Woodford to design and make the Robin Hood statue, at a cost of £5,000.Woodford meticulously researched the details for his subject, creating a stocky-built figure that depicted how the historians believed medieval foresters from the period would have looked. This proved controversial with some people, who expected a more lithe Errol Flynn-like figure, with a triangular felt hat. But there was common agreement that Robin, as a quintessential outsider, should be on the outside of the castle, aiming his bow at the Establishment.

Located on Castle Road in Nottingham, England, this 7ft statue of Robin Hood stands on a two-and-a-half ton block of white Clipsham stone. Cast in eight pieces of half-inch thick bronze (ostensibly made to last for 6,000 years), and weighing half a ton,  the statue was unveiled by the Duchess of Portland on July 24th 1952.

Businessman and benefactor Philip E F Clay, gifted the statue to Nottingham in order to commemorate the city’s famous folk hero. In 1949, Clay commissioned the respected Royal Academy sculptor James Woodford to design and make the Robin Hood statue, at a cost of £5,000.

Woodford meticulously researched the details for his subject, creating a stocky-built figure that depicted how the historians believed medieval foresters from the period would have looked. This proved controversial with some people, who expected a more lithe Errol Flynn-like figure, with a triangular felt hat. But there was common agreement that Robin, as a quintessential outsider, should be on the outside of the castle, aiming his bow at the Establishment.

31

Mar

One of Manchester’s two statues of John Bright (1811-1889), the Quaker, British Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with Richard Cobden in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League.This statue was photographed on the staircase of Manchester Town Hall in 2012. Bright was one of the greatest orators of his generation, and a strong critic of British foreign policy. He sat in the House of Commons from 1843 to 1889.

One of Manchester’s two statues of John Bright (1811-1889), the Quaker, British Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with Richard Cobden in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League.

This statue was photographed on the staircase of Manchester Town Hall in 2012. Bright was one of the greatest orators of his generation, and a strong critic of British foreign policy. He sat in the House of Commons from 1843 to 1889.

28

Mar

Located on the junction of Edinburgh’s George Street and Castle Street, this statue of Thomas Chalmers (1780 – 1847) was created by noted Edinburgh sculptor Sir John Steell (1804 – 1891).As minister of St John’s parish, one of Glasgow’s poorer parishes, Chalmers overhauled the way the parish was run and drastically reduced the cost of poor relief. From there, he became Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of St Andrews and then Professor of Theology at the University of Edinburgh. Chalmers was also one of the leaders of the Disruption of 1843, which led to the creation of the Free Church of Scotland, of which he became the first moderator. When he died in 1847, it was said that half the population of Edinburgh turned out for his funeral.

Located on the junction of Edinburgh’s George Street and Castle Street, this statue of Thomas Chalmers (1780 – 1847) was created by noted Edinburgh sculptor Sir John Steell (1804 – 1891).

As minister of St John’s parish, one of Glasgow’s poorer parishes, Chalmers overhauled the way the parish was run and drastically reduced the cost of poor relief. From there, he became Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of St Andrews and then Professor of Theology at the University of Edinburgh. Chalmers was also one of the leaders of the Disruption of 1843, which led to the creation of the Free Church of Scotland, of which he became the first moderator. When he died in 1847, it was said that half the population of Edinburgh turned out for his funeral.

27

Mar

Monuments to Scottish poet Robert Burns can be found in such diverse locations as Adelaide and Philadelphia. This bust, photographed in 2014, once stood in Carlisle’s public library, but can now be found in the town’s Tullie House Museum.
On May 27th 1787, Burns journeyed through the northernmost parts of England, such as Alnwick, Newcastle and Carlisle, on his way to the Scottish town of Dunfries. More information on his visit to Carlisle can be found here.

Monuments to Scottish poet Robert Burns can be found in such diverse locations as Adelaide and Philadelphia. This bust, photographed in 2014, once stood in Carlisle’s public library, but can now be found in the town’s Tullie House Museum.

On May 27th 1787, Burns journeyed through the northernmost parts of England, such as Alnwick, Newcastle and Carlisle, on his way to the Scottish town of Dunfries. More information on his visit to Carlisle can be found here.