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07

Jul

Sir John Betjeman, CBE (1906–1984) was an English poet, writer, broadcaster and railway enthusiast, who was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1972 until his death. Starting his career as a journalist, he ended it as one of the most popular British Poets Laureate, and a much-loved figure on British television. In the early 1970s, he began a recording career of four influential albums, in which his poetry was set to music.In 2007, on the reopening of London’s St Pancras station, a statue of Betjeman was commissioned. This proposal, by artist Martin Jennings, was selected from the shortlist. The finished work was erected at platform level, with a series of slate roundels depicting selections of Betjeman’s writings.

Sir John Betjeman, CBE (1906–1984) was an English poet, writer, broadcaster and railway enthusiast, who was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1972 until his death. Starting his career as a journalist, he ended it as one of the most popular British Poets Laureate, and a much-loved figure on British television. In the early 1970s, he began a recording career of four influential albums, in which his poetry was set to music.

In 2007, on the reopening of London’s St Pancras station, a statue of Betjeman was commissioned. This proposal, by artist Martin Jennings, was selected from the shortlist. The finished work was erected at platform level, with a series of slate roundels depicting selections of Betjeman’s writings.

01

Jul

Entitled ‘A Yottie’, this statue was commissioned by the Association of Royal Yachtsmen Trust, as a tribute to the Officers and Royal Yachtsmen who served on board The Royal Yacht Britannia. The statue stands at Edinburgh’s Ocean Terminal, where the yacht is now moored. The statue was created using the bronze from one of the ship’s old propellers. It was modelled on Ellis ‘Norrie’ Norrell MVO RVM, Britannia’s longest serving Royal Yachtsman, who served 34 years from January 1954 to September 1988.

Entitled ‘A Yottie’, this statue was commissioned by the Association of Royal Yachtsmen Trust, as a tribute to the Officers and Royal Yachtsmen who served on board The Royal Yacht Britannia. The statue stands at Edinburgh’s Ocean Terminal, where the yacht is now moored. The statue was created using the bronze from one of the ship’s old propellers. It was modelled on Ellis ‘Norrie’ Norrell MVO RVM, Britannia’s longest serving Royal Yachtsman, who served 34 years from January 1954 to September 1988.

30

Jun

The Meeting Place is a 9-metre (29.5 ft) tall, 20-tonne bronze statue, standing at the south end of the upper level of London’s St Pancras station, just beneath the station clock. It was designed by British artist Paul Day, and is intended to evoke the romance of travel through its depiction of a couple locked in an amorous embrace. The couple’s 1940s attire have led many people to compare them to the characters played by Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson in the 1945 David Lean film ‘Brief Encounter’.In 2008, Day added a bronze relief frieze around the plinth, which originally depicted a commuter falling into the path of an Underground train driven by the Grim Reaper. Day revised the frieze before the final version was installed.Though popular with commuters, the sculpture received a poor critical reception, being cited by Antony Gormley as “a very good example of the crap out there”, referring to poor public art in the UK.

The Meeting Place is a 9-metre (29.5 ft) tall, 20-tonne bronze statue, standing at the south end of the upper level of London’s St Pancras station, just beneath the station clock. It was designed by British artist Paul Day, and is intended to evoke the romance of travel through its depiction of a couple locked in an amorous embrace. The couple’s 1940s attire have led many people to compare them to the characters played by Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson in the 1945 David Lean film ‘Brief Encounter’.

In 2008, Day added a bronze relief frieze around the plinth, which originally depicted a commuter falling into the path of an Underground train driven by the Grim Reaper. Day revised the frieze before the final version was installed.

Though popular with commuters, the sculpture received a poor critical reception, being cited by Antony Gormley as “a very good example of the crap out there”, referring to poor public art in the UK.

09

Jun

Known as the “Cheering Fusilier”, ‘The Boer War Memorial to the Lancashire Fusiliers’ is the work of legendary sculptor George Frampton (a major wheel in the ‘New Sculpture’ movement, whose statues have featured on this blog many times before). It stands at the corner of Chapel Street and Oldfield Road in Salford, England.It is believed that Colour Sergeant Walter Dyer “The Shouting Fusilier” was asked to pose as a model. The memorial was originally unveiled on July 13, 1905 by Edward VII, who was accompanied by Queen Alexandra, as part of a Royal visit to Greater Manchester. The unveiling reportedly attracted a crowd of thousands.In June 2012, the memorial was rededicated following significant refurbishments. As the memorial is now a Grade II listed structure, Salford City Council employed specialist granite suppliers and restoration experts to install new granite steps, new ramps and lighting. A YouTube video of the restoration can be seen here, if you’re that way inclined.

Known as the “Cheering Fusilier”, ‘The Boer War Memorial to the Lancashire Fusiliers’ is the work of legendary sculptor George Frampton (a major wheel in the ‘New Sculpture’ movement, whose statues have featured on this blog many times before). It stands at the corner of Chapel Street and Oldfield Road in Salford, England.

It is believed that Colour Sergeant Walter Dyer “The Shouting Fusilier” was asked to pose as a model. The memorial was originally unveiled on July 13, 1905 by Edward VII, who was accompanied by Queen Alexandra, as part of a Royal visit to Greater Manchester. The unveiling reportedly attracted a crowd of thousands.

In June 2012, the memorial was rededicated following significant refurbishments. As the memorial is now a Grade II listed structure, Salford City Council employed specialist granite suppliers and restoration experts to install new granite steps, new ramps and lighting. A YouTube video of the restoration can be seen here, if you’re that way inclined.

29

May

At the centre of Rome’s semi-circular Piazza della Repubblica, at the summit of Viminal Hill, stands the Fountain of the Naiads. The naiads, a type of nymph who presided over fountains and other bodies of freshwater, were sculpted by Mario Rutelli in 1901. In the centre is Rutelli’s Glauco group (circa 1911-12), symbolizing the dominion of the man over natural force and replacing a previous sculpture.This photograph was taken one evening in 2009. In the background, the porticos around the piazza can be seen. These buildings, known as Piazza dell’Esedra, were built between 1887 and 1898 by Gaetano Koch, in memory of the ancient buildings that stood on the same site.

At the centre of Rome’s semi-circular Piazza della Repubblica, at the summit of Viminal Hill, stands the Fountain of the Naiads. The naiads, a type of nymph who presided over fountains and other bodies of freshwater, were sculpted by Mario Rutelli in 1901. In the centre is Rutelli’s Glauco group (circa 1911-12), symbolizing the dominion of the man over natural force and replacing a previous sculpture.

This photograph was taken one evening in 2009. In the background, the porticos around the piazza can be seen. These buildings, known as Piazza dell’Esedra, were built between 1887 and 1898 by Gaetano Koch, in memory of the ancient buildings that stood on the same site.

27

May

David Annand’s 2004 statue of Scottish poet Robert Fergusson (1750-1774), photographed in 2013, standing outside Edinburgh’s Kirk Of The Canongate churchyard, where his grave lies (initially a pauper’s grave, until Robert Burns paid for a gravestone). Commissioned by the organisation Friends of Robert Fergusson, and costing just £30,000, the statue was unveiled on 17 October 2004, following a competition for a memorial to Fergusson.The maquettes of three different sculptors were displayed around Edinburgh for six months, with the public being invited to vote for their favourite. More than 15,000 people voted, and David Annand’s maquette took 67% of the vote.Despite a short life, Fergusson’s career was highly influential, especially through its impact on Robert Burns (who called Fergusson ’ ‘my elder brother in misfortune, by far my elder brother in the muse’). Fergusson is often called ‘Scotland’s Forgotten Poet’. When he died in the Edinburgh Bedlam aged 24, he left only fifty poems in English and thirty-three in Scots.

David Annand’s 2004 statue of Scottish poet Robert Fergusson (1750-1774), photographed in 2013, standing outside Edinburgh’s Kirk Of The Canongate churchyard, where his grave lies (initially a pauper’s grave, until Robert Burns paid for a gravestone). Commissioned by the organisation Friends of Robert Fergusson, and costing just £30,000, the statue was unveiled on 17 October 2004, following a competition for a memorial to Fergusson.

The maquettes of three different sculptors were displayed around Edinburgh for six months, with the public being invited to vote for their favourite. More than 15,000 people voted, and David Annand’s maquette took 67% of the vote.

Despite a short life, Fergusson’s career was highly influential, especially through its impact on Robert Burns (who called Fergusson ’ ‘my elder brother in misfortune, by far my elder brother in the muse’). Fergusson is often called ‘Scotland’s Forgotten Poet’. When he died in the Edinburgh Bedlam aged 24, he left only fifty poems in English and thirty-three in Scots.

23

May

Photographed in 2013, this bronze statue of George Stephenson (1781-1848) stands on Neville Road junction by Westgate Road, close to Newcastle Central Station. Stephenson was an English civil engineer and mechanical engineer, who built the first public railway line in the world to use steam locomotives, and is known as the “Father of Railways”.Sculptor John Graham Lough (1798-1876) was a blacksmith’s son, who developed a passion for clay modelling, and was apprenticed to a stonemason, before developing a reputation as a renowned and eccentric sculptor. On 3rd October 1862, the monument was inaugurated at a ceremony attended, it was claimed, by over 100,000 spectators. It shows Stephenson in late middle age with pensive expression, rolled-up plan in hand and a huge toga-like ‘Northumbrian plaid’ scarf over his shoulder.

Photographed in 2013, this bronze statue of George Stephenson (1781-1848) stands on Neville Road junction by Westgate Road, close to Newcastle Central Station. Stephenson was an English civil engineer and mechanical engineer, who built the first public railway line in the world to use steam locomotives, and is known as the “Father of Railways”.

Sculptor John Graham Lough (1798-1876) was a blacksmith’s son, who developed a passion for clay modelling, and was apprenticed to a stonemason, before developing a reputation as a renowned and eccentric sculptor. On 3rd October 1862, the monument was inaugurated at a ceremony attended, it was claimed, by over 100,000 spectators. It shows Stephenson in late middle age with pensive expression, rolled-up plan in hand and a huge toga-like ‘Northumbrian plaid’ scarf over his shoulder.

19

May

West Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh, 2013. Built in 1877, this seated bronze figure of James Young Simpson sits in academic robes on a stone plinth, and was designed by William Brodie RSA (1815-1881) and cast by Masefield and Co. Bronze-founders of London.
Simpson was born in Bathgate, West Lothian of humble origins, and rose to become Professor of Midwifery at Edinburgh University in 1840, where he pioneered the use of chloroform as an anaesthetic. The plinth is inscribed, ‘Sir James Young Simpson, Baronet, MD, DCL, Born 1811. Died 1870. Pioneer of Anaesthesia’.

West Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh, 2013. Built in 1877, this seated bronze figure of James Young Simpson sits in academic robes on a stone plinth, and was designed by William Brodie RSA (1815-1881) and cast by Masefield and Co. Bronze-founders of London.

Simpson was born in Bathgate, West Lothian of humble origins, and rose to become Professor of Midwifery at Edinburgh University in 1840, where he pioneered the use of chloroform as an anaesthetic. The plinth is inscribed, ‘Sir James Young Simpson, Baronet, MD, DCL, Born 1811. Died 1870. Pioneer of Anaesthesia’.

15

May

This photo was taken in 2009, in Room 4 of the British Museum in London. It shows the left arm from an 18th Dynasty Ancient Egyptian colossal red granite statue of Amenhotep III, which dates from c.1370 BC.In 1817, the broken statue was discovered in the temple enclosure of Mut at Karnak in Egypt by Giovanni Battista Belzoni and Henry William Beechey..The 3.30m arm is one of only two known surviving parts of the statue (the other being the head, which is also in the museum). Both parts were acquired in 1823 by the British Museum from Henry SaltMy friend Sarah can be seen to the left of the photo.

This photo was taken in 2009, in Room 4 of the British Museum in London. It shows the left arm from an 18th Dynasty Ancient Egyptian colossal red granite statue of Amenhotep III, which dates from c.1370 BC.

In 1817, the broken statue was discovered in the temple enclosure of Mut at Karnak in Egypt by Giovanni Battista Belzoni and Henry William Beechey..The 3.30m arm is one of only two known surviving parts of the statue (the other being the head, which is also in the museum). Both parts were acquired in 1823 by the British Museum from Henry Salt

My friend Sarah can be seen to the left of the photo.

14

May

Photographed in 2013, this statue is located in Dean’s Park in York. The park, located next to York Minster, was the site of the old archiepiscopal palace, built in the 13th century, abandoned three hundred years later and left to crumble. Only the palace chapel (now the Minster Library) and a short section of arcading remains.

Photographed in 2013, this statue is located in Dean’s Park in York. The park, located next to York Minster, was the site of the old archiepiscopal palace, built in the 13th century, abandoned three hundred years later and left to crumble. Only the palace chapel (now the Minster Library) and a short section of arcading remains.